Skip to content

White like snow

March 14, 2010

Άσπρη σαν το χιόνι

Δεν ενθυμούμαι πλέον πώς μου το έλεγε η αείμνηστος η κυρούλα μου το ωραίον εκείνο παραμύθι. Επρόκειτο δι ένα βασιλόπουλο, οπού δεν έστεργε ποτέ να πανδρευθή, ανίσως δεν εύρισκε μίαν βασιλοπούλα, την όμορφη του κόσμου, όπου να είναι άσπρη σαν το χιόνι, και κόκκινη σαν το αίμα. Και ύστερα νομίζω, το βασιλόπουλο επήγε να λαφοκυνηγήση εις τέτοιον καιρόν, τον οποίον έχομεν αυτήν την εβδομάδα, ακόμη και εις τας Αθήνας. Κι έρριξε μίαν τουφεκιάν επάνω στους χιονισμένους κάμπους και στα λιβάδια και στα πλάγια των βουνών κι εμάτιασε μίαν έλαφον, και το αίμα της ελάφου εχύθη επάνω στα χιόνια, κι εκεί, δεν ηξεύρω πώς, εγεννήθη μία βασιλοπούλα, κι εμεγάλωσε και ήταν άσπρη σαν το χιόνι και κόκκινη σαν το αίμα. Και το βασιλόπουλο ηύρε την νύμφην των ονείρων του, πλασμένην από χιόνι, όπως ο Πυγμαλίων την ηύρε από μάρμαρον. Όλοι αυτοί υπήρξαν ευτυχείς εναντίον προς τον στίχον του Ιταλού Ποιητού, και συμφωνότεροι προς τον ορισμόν του αρχαίου φιλοσόφου. Ευτυχείς, διότι δεν υπήρξαν.

This passage is the first paragraph of  a short story of A. Papadiamantis, one of the greatest Greek novelists. The language he uses is quite different from Modern Greek, because he uses both ancient and popular vocabulary of his era. I will try to give a transformation  in Modern Greek:

Δεν θυμάμαι πια πώς μου το έλεγε η αείμνηστος η δασκάλα  μου το ωραίο εκείνο παραμύθι,  που αφορούσε ένα βασιλόπουλο, οπού δεν έλεγε ποτέ να παντρευτείεκτός και αν εύρισκε μία βασιλοπούλα, την όμορφη του κόσμου, που να είναι άσπρη σαν το χιόνι, και κόκκινη σαν το αίμα. Και ύστερα νομίζω, το βασιλόπουλο πήγε να κυνηγήσει ελάφια με  τέτοιον καιρόν, τον οποίον έχουμε αυτήν την εβδομάδα, ακόμη και στην Αθήνα. Και  έριξε μία τουφεκιά επάνω στους χιονισμένους κάμπους και στα λιβάδια και στα πλάγια των βουνών κι χτύπησε ένα ελάφι (θηλυκό), και το αίμα του ελαφιού  χύθηκε επάνω στα χιόνια, κι εκεί, δεν ξέρω πώς, γεννήθηκε μία βασιλοπούλα, κι μεγάλωσε και ήταν άσπρη σαν το χιόνι και κόκκινη σαν το αίμα. Και το βασιλόπουλο βρήκε την νύφη των ονείρων του, πλασμένη από χιόνι, όπως ο Πυγμαλίων την βρήκε  από μάρμαρον. Όλοι αυτοί υπήρξαν ευτυχισμένοι, ενάντιον  προς τον στίχο του Ιταλού Ποιητή, και πιο σύμφωνοι προς τον ορισμό του αρχαίου φιλοσόφου. Ευτυχισμένοι, επειδή δεν υπήρξαν.

I marked with Italics the changes from the original text , but unfortunately the text becomes more dull and trivial. The charm of  the language of Papadiamantis is lost. Anyone who had a medium level studies of ancient Greek can understand that text , but recently even in Greece  were published translations of  his works in modern Greek. In general , this is a sign of our ages , as literacy in Greek tends to fall back even in Greece and the new generation can not enjoy a beautiful text like this in its prototype.

I do not remember any more how my beloved teacher  narrated that  beautiful fairytale, concerning a prince, who  never wished to get married  unless he would found a princess, the most beautiful in the world,  white like snow, and red like blood. And then I think the prince went to hunt deers in such a time, like  we have this week, even in Athens. And threw a shot on the snowy plains and grasslands and on mountain slopes and hit a deer , and the deer’s blood spilled onto the snow, and there, I do not know how, was born a princess, and grew up and was white like snow and red as blood. And the prince found the bride of his dreams, created by snow, like Pygmalion found her created by marble. All of them were happy, which is contrary to the lyrics of the Italian poet, and more consistent with the definition of the ancient philosopher,  happy because they were not existed.

Even in a second translation the text keeps its strength and beauty, and that is because it comes from a man who is considered as the Dostoevsky of  Greece.   If there is something you would like to clarify, do not hesitate to ask in the  comments below.

To listen the story press here .

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: