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Noun declension – Masculines IΙ

June 12, 2010
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In our previous post we examined the declension of ισοσύλλαβα masculine Greek nouns. So today, we will examine the declension of ανισοσύλλαβα ending in -ας, -ης, -της (with double plural endings), -ες and -ους .

  • We already mentioned the example of a noun in -ας (βοριάς) in our previous post. Another noun of this category (ανισοσύλλαβα σε -ας) is  ο σφουγγαράς,
Nominative Genitive Accusative Vocative
ο σφουγγαράς του σφουγγαρά τον σφουγγαρά σφουγγαρά
οι σφουγγαράδες των σφουγγαράδων τους σφουγγαράδες σφουγγαράδες

In the same category we have the nouns αμαξάς , γαλατάς, καστανάς, μαρμαράς, ψαράς (all indicating a profession), but also σατανάς (satan), ραγιάς (slave), βοριάς (north wind) etc.

Wishing to reply to a comment of Lyzazel to my previous post I would say that masculine nouns in -ας form the Nominative, Accusative and Vocative case in -αδες when they are ανισοσύλλαβα(more syllables in plural), and in -ες when they are ισοσύλλαβα (equal syllables in plural). So, I hope that I made it clear so far.

  • The ανισοσύλλαβα masculine nouns ending in -ης p.e. βαρκάρης, form their plural the Nominative, Accusative and Vocative case in -ηδες, as following
Nominative Genitive Accusative Vocative
ο βαρκάρης του βαρκάρη τον βαρκάρη βαρκάρη
οι βαρκάρηδες των βαρκάρηδων τους βαρκάρηδες βαρκάρηδες

In this category we have also the nouns νοικοκύρης, γκιόνης, μανάβης, τιμονιέρης, περιβολάρης etc.

  • The ανισοσύλλαβα masculine nouns ending in -της (with double plural endings both in -τες and -τάδες), p.e. like in the noun δουλευτής,
Nominative Genitive Accusative Vocative
ο βουλευτής του βουλευτή τον βουλευτή βουλευτή
οι βουλευτές των βουλευτών τους βουλευτές βουλευτές
οι βουλευτάδες των βουλευτάδων τους βουλευτάδες βουλευτάδες

In this category we have also the nouns πραματευτής, βουτηχτής, διαλαλητής, κλαδευτής, τραγουδιστής etc.

  • The ανισοσύλλαβα masculine nouns ending in -ες (plural ending  in  -έδες), p.e. like in the noun καναπές,
Nominative Genitive Accusative Vocative
ο καναπές του καναπέ τον καναπέ καναπέ
οι καναπέδες των καναπέδων τους καναπέδες καναπέδες

Similar nouns of this category are καφές, μιναρές, τενεκές etc.

  • The last category of ανισοσύλλαβα masculine nouns are these ending in -ους (which in plural is getting -ούδες) , p.e. the noun παππούς (the grandfather),
Nominative Genitive Accusative Vocative
ο παππούς του παππού τον παππού παππού
οι παππούδες των παππούδων τους παππούδες παππούδες

The name Ιησούς (Jesus) has the same declension.

Summary

  1. The masculine nouns form the genitives , accusatives and vocatives of the singular without final
  2. In the plural there are 3 identical cases : the nominative , the accusative and the vocative
  3. The masculine nouns ending in -ος do not follow the upper 2 first rules
  4. The genitive case of all masculine nouns ends in -ων

Hope that this post made clear after all how we decline all masculine nouns in Modern Greek. If not so  and you still have questions or remarks, please leave your comment …

4 Comments leave one →
  1. June 13, 2010 7:43 pm

    So the distinction of ισοσύλλαβα and ανισοσύλλαβα is only for the δες thing (because all the forms are identical)?

    If that’s true, that’s cool, but then why make two posts and not one? Well, anyway.

    In any case, I didn’t still quite get it. You write:
    “masculine nouns in -ας form the Nominative, Accusative and Vocative case in -αδες when they are ανισοσύλλαβα(more syllables in plural), and in -ες when they are ισοσύλλαβα (equal syllables in plural). ”

    So, if we want to find out if the plural has δες or only ες in the ending we have to … go to the plural and see how many syllables it has. But hey, we are only forming the plural, we don’t know it yet.

    Perhaps it is the case that this extra letter δ does never ever change the number of syllables there are… then things would sorta sort themselves out. I am not sure if that is indeed the case though.

    Great blogposts, by the way, I am finding them very useful. I very much prefer learning the rules from you than from grammar books.

    I will be waiting for the feminine part too. That will be useful to relearn (I first have to continue reading trying to “get” the passive voice and its formation, though… the grammar books leave me desperate there).

  2. June 14, 2010 6:41 am

    Well ,
    you have a point on that,which I missed of course because I do not use any grammar when I speak Greek not having to remember any rules…
    Regarding the masculines in -ας and your question when they are ισοσύλλαβα and when ανισοσύλλαβα, Ι think I can give you a tip here. So when the noun refers to a profession , p.e.
    γαλατάς , σφουγγαράς, καστανάς, περιπτεράς etc. all these are ανισοσύλλαβα and make their plural in -δες.
    On the other hand, when they indicate a place or a living place (for animals or people), p.e. περιστερώνας (pidgin nest), στρατώνας (military camp), ορνιθώνας (chikens place) ..these are ισοσύλλαβα.
    Check also the other category of ισοσύλλαβα in -ας here http://daskalosk.gr/AS.htm
    (like πατέρας, μήνας , κήρυκας and the like). I think that these ones you have to memorise them.
    Maybe I will summarize the whole thig in a table.

  3. June 14, 2010 8:22 pm

    Thanks for the tips!

    It seems that δες or ες is not such a big deal that it would really need further comment. Not at this point, at least.

    I’ve been listening to Greek material (including your podcast) and realizing how little I know so far.

    Oh well, but that’s cool. The same happened to me in Portugal when a few people asked me things about a hostel and I couldn’t even understand what they are talking about. That was a bit frustrating. I moved on and learned a lot since then.

  4. June 17, 2010 3:36 am

    That’s an amazing post. Thanks a lot

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